Can a Debt Collector Take My Social Security Benefits?

Can my Social Security benefits be garnished if I have outstanding debts? I just turned 62 and would like to start collecting my retirement benefits, but I want to find this out before I apply.

Whether your Social Security benefits are garnishable depends on who you owe. Banks and other financial creditors, for example, cannot touch your Social Security checks. But if Uncle Sam is collecting on a debt, some of your benefits are fair game. Here is what you should know.

Creditor Protections

If you have credit card debts, medical bills, unpaid personal loans or pay day loans, you will be happy to know that your Social Security benefits are safe from your creditors. Section 207 of the Social Security Act prohibits debt collectors or a bankruptcy court from dipping into your bank account to take Social Security money for purposes of paying off what you owe.

In addition, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), veterans benefits, federal employee and civil service retirement benefits and benefits administered by the Railroad Retirement Board Administration cannot be touched either.

Do be aware, however, that creditors can still take legal action against you to recover what you owe. Depending on your state's laws, creditors may be able to garnish your wages and tap into other allowable assets, if you have any.

Government Garnishment

If, however, you owe money to Uncle Sam, it is a very different story. The federal government can garnish a portion of your Social Security benefits to repay several types of debts, including federal income taxes, federal student loans, state-ordered child support and alimony, nontax debt owed to other federal agencies, defaulted federal home loans and certain civil penalties. Note that, if you receive SSI, those benefits cannot be garnished under any circumstance.

The amount that can actually be taken depends on the type of debt. In most situations, the government can claim 15% of your benefits to cover your debt, but under the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, it must leave you at least $750 each month, unless the levy is for federal income taxes. In that case, the government is not required to leave $750 behind.

The outcome is different if the debt is for child support or alimony payments. Depending on your state laws, the court may be able to take half of your benefits or more to pay your obligations to your children or ex-spouse.

If you think your Social Security benefits might be claimed to pay overdue government debts, you need to address the problem rather than ignore it. Most government agencies are happy to work with you, so long as you are willing to work with them.

The government typically sends several letters before it takes action to collect a debt. The final letter will inform you of the intent to levy Social Security payments and, after that, you typically will have 30 days to contact the agency and work out a payment plan.

Get Help

To get a handle on your debt problems, consider contacting a financial counseling agency that offers free or low-cost services to help you manage your financial problems. To locate a credible agency in your area, contact the National Foundation for Credit Counseling by visiting its website or calling 800-388-2227.

You should also make sure you are not missing out on any financial assistance programs. The National Council on Aging's website contains a database of more than 2,500 federal, state and local programs that can help seniors with prescription drug costs, health care, food, utilities and other basic needs. The site will help you locate programs that you may be eligible for and will show you how to apply.

The Differences Between Alzheimer's and Dementia

What are the differences between Alzheimer's disease and dementia? My aunt has dementia, but my family members do not know if she has Alzheimer's disease. This is very confusing to me. Can you help me understand?

Many people use the words "Alzheimer's disease" and "dementia" interchangeably, but they are not the same conditions. In fact, there is a form of dementia that is completely unrelated to Alzheimer's disease. Here is what you should know.

Dementia versus Alzheimer's

Dementia is a general term for a set of symptoms that includes memory loss, impaired communication skills, a decline in reasoning and changes in behavior. It is typically more common in people over the age of 65.

Alzheimer's disease is a specific illness that is the most common cause of dementia. Though many diseases can cause dementia, Alzheimer's - which affects 5.7 million Americans today - accounts for 60% to 80% of dementia cases, which is why you often hear the terms used interchangeably.

There are, however, many other conditions that can cause symptoms of dementia. Vascular dementia, which is the second most common cause, accounting for about 10% of dementia cases. Vascular dementia is caused by a stroke or poor blood flow to the brain.

Other degenerative disorders that can cause dementia include Lewy body dementia, Parkinson's disease, Frontotemporal dementia, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), Huntington's disease and Korsakoff Syndrome. Some patients may also have more than one form of dementia, which is known as mixed dementia.

Dementia is caused by damage to brain cells, but the symptoms can vary depending on the cause. In the case of Alzheimer's disease, damage is caused by protein fragments or plaque that accumulates in the space between nerve cells and twisted tangles of another protein that build up inside cells.

In Alzheimer's disease, dementia gets progressively worse. It can progress to the point where patients cannot carry out daily activities, speak, respond to their environment, swallow or walk. Although some treatments may temporarily ease symptoms, the downward progression of the disease continues and there is no known cure.

Some forms of dementia, however, are reversible, which is why it's important to be evaluated by a physician early on. Vitamin deficiencies, thyroid problems, brain tumors, depression, excessive alcohol use, medication side effects and certain infectious diseases can cause reversible forms of dementia.

Another treatable form of dementia is a condition known as normal pressure hydrocephalus, which is caused by a buildup of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. This may be relieved by surgically implanting a shunt to drain off excess fluid. This type of dementia is often preceded or accompanied by difficulty walking and incontinence.

To learn more about different types of dementia, including the symptoms, risks, causes and treatments visit the Alzheimer's Association's website.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published July 6, 2018
Print
Subsribe to RSS Feed

Choosing an Executor for Your Will

Do you have any recommendations or tips for selecting an executor of a will? I am putting together my will and I want to make sure I know my options and choose someone who is capable of taking on this responsibility.

An executor is the person or institution that will be in charge of administering your estate and carrying out your final wishes. Choosing an executor is one of the most important decisions when preparing a will.

A good executor can help ensure the prompt and accurate distribution of your possessions with minimal problems. Some of the required duties include: filing court papers to start the probate process; managing your estate's assets; using your estate's funds to pay debts, taxes and bills; handling details like terminating credit cards and providing notice of death to banks and government agencies, like the Social Security Administration and the U.S. Post Office; preparing and filing final income tax returns; and distributing assets to the beneficiaries named in the will.

Given all the responsibility, the ideal candidate should be someone who is honest, dependable, well-organized, good with paperwork and vigilant about meeting deadlines.

Whom to Choose

Most people's first inclination is to name a family member, especially a spouse or child, as executor. If, however, you do not have an obvious family member to choose, you may want to ask a trusted friend. Be sure to choose someone in good health and younger than you who will be able to carry out your plans.

If your executor of choice lives in a different state, you may want to talk to an attorney to see if your state's laws impose any special requirements. Some states require an out-of-state executor to be a family member or a beneficiary while others may require a bond to protect your heirs in case of mismanagement or the appointment of an in-state agent.

Also, keep in mind that if the person you choose needs help settling your estate, they can always call on an expert, like an attorney or tax accountant, to guide them through the process. If your executor chooses to do so, your estate will cover any costs involved.

If you don't have a friend or relative you feel comfortable selecting, you could name a third party executor like a bank, trust company or a professional who has experience administering estates. If you need help locating a professional, the National Association of Estate Planners and Councils and the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys have great resources and provide directories on their websites to help you select an executor.

Executor Fees

Often times, family members and close friends who are also beneficiaries will agree to serve as executor for free. But, if you opt for a third-party executor, your estate will have to pay the third-party's fee. Each state has laws that govern how an executor is paid - either based on a percentage of the estate, a flat fee or an hourly rate.

Get Approval

Make sure to ask the executor you have chosen if he or she is okay with serving as your executor before naming that individual in your will. Once you have made your choice, go over the financial details in your will with that person and let him or her know where you keep all your important documents and financial information.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

How Medicare Handles Second Medical Opinions

Does Medicare cover second medical opinions? The doctor I currently see thinks I need back surgery, but I would like to find out more about other treatment options before I proceed. What can you tell me?

Medicare does pay for second opinions if your current doctor has recommended surgery or some other major diagnostic or therapeutic procedure. Getting a second medical opinion from another doctor is a smart idea. A second opinion may offer you a fresh perspective and additional options for treating your back condition so you can make a more informed decision. Or, if the second doctor agrees with your current doctor's opinion, it can give you some reassurance moving forward.

If you are enrolled in original Medicare, 80% of the costs for second medical opinions are covered under Part B (you or your Medicare supplemental policy are responsible for the other 20%), and you do not need to obtain an order or referral from your doctor to see another doctor for a second opinion. Medicare will even pay 80% of the costs for a third medical opinion, if the first two differ.

Most Medicare Advantage plans cover second opinions too, but you may need to follow certain steps to obtain coverage. For example, some plans will only help pay for a second opinion if you receive a referral from your primary care doctor. Plans also may require you to see doctors in their networks only. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, you'll need to call to find your plan's rules.

Finding Another Doctor


To find a doctor for a second opinion you can ask your current doctor a recommendation, ask another doctor you trust for a referral or you can find one on your own. Whatever route you choose, it is best to go with a doctor that is affiliated with a different practice or hospital than your original doctor. Hospitals and practices may have set procedures and practices when it comes to treatments and are likely to offer similar advice.

If you choose to search for a doctor on your own, check out the Physician Compare tool at Medicare.gov/physiciancompare. This will let you find doctors by name, medical specialty or by geographic location that accept original Medicare. You can also get this information by calling Medicare at 800-633-4227. If you are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan, call or visit your plan's website for a list of candidates.

Once you have selected a second doctor, you will need to ask your current doctor's office to send your medical records to the second doctor. Alternatively, you may be able to pick them up and deliver them yourself. By providing the second doctor your medical records, you can avoid repeating the tests you have already had. Note that, if the second doctor wants additional tests performed, Medicare will help pay for these tests too.

For more information, see the Medicare publication "Getting a Second Opinion Before Surgery" at medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/02173-Getting-a-Second-Opinion-Before-Surgery.pdf.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published June 22, 2018
Subsribe to RSS Feed

Tips for Living with Low Vision

What resources can you recommend to help individuals living with vision loss? My husband has macular degeneration that has progressed to the point that he is unable to perform many of his routine activities anymore, and has become very discouraged.

Unfortunately, there are around 15 million Americans, like your husband, living with macular degeneration. Over time, this progressive disease can rob people of their central vision, making everyday tasks, like driving a car, reading the newspaper or watching television, extremely challenging. Here are some resources that may help.

Low Vision Help


The best place to get resources for living and coping with macular degeneration is at a vision rehabilitation agency or clinic. Typically run by state agencies, nonprofit organizations or private eye care clinics, there are more than 1,500 of these services scattered across the country helping people who are living with all types of uncorrectable vision impairments. Most state and nonprofit vision rehabilitation services are free or low-cost, while private clinics typically charge a fee or may accept Medicare.

While vision rehabilitation does not restore lost eyesight, it may help people maximize their existing eyesight. If an individual has completely lost his or her vision, these services can provide techniques and tools to help maintain an independent lifestyle.

Vision rehabilitations services often provide counseling, support groups and various training programs. The training programs may include instruction on how to perform daily living tasks with low vision and how to use visual and adaptive devices and assistive technologies to help improve quality of life.

These services also offer guidance on how to make a home safer and easier to maneuver for those with vision impairments. Some agencies will send a specialist out to work with people in the comfort of their own homes.

To find a vision rehabilitation service in your area, call the American Foundation for the Blind referral line at 800-232-5463 or visit the VisionAware website. You can also download the VisionAware app to connect to various types of low-vision resources in your area.

If, however, you do not live near a vision rehabilitation service, you can also get help from an occupational therapist (OT), who can provide low vision training in your home. Medicare, if prescribed by your eye doctor or healthcare provider, may provide coverage.

Online Help


Another convenient place to find help for your husband is the VisionAware website. This is a free website designed to help adults who are losing their vision. It provides information on eye conditions, along with dozens of practical tips and instructional videos on living with vision loss. The topics include ideas on adapting your home to make it easier to navigate, techniques for traveling safely outside the home and various tips on how to manage things like finances, medications and other tasks like cooking, cleaning, grooming, reading and writing. It also offers a comprehensive list of low vision products and technologies that can help those who suffer from vision loss stay active and independent. It also includes product reviews that are published in their online magazine, "AccessWorld."

Other Resources


Some other good resources that can help include: the Hadley Institute (800-323-4238), which offers dozens of free online instructional videos to help the blind or visually impaired live independently; Ears for Eyes (800-843-6816) that provides free audio lessons that teach low-vision adaptive daily living skills; and Living Well with Low Vision (800-331-2020), which offers up-to-date information and free materials for people living with severe vision impairment.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published June 15, 2018

How to Make a Living Will

What is the best way to go about drafting a living will? I recently retired and would like to start getting my affairs in order.

Preparing a living will is a smart decision that enables you to direct what type of care and treatment you want to receive at the end of your life. Here is what you should know, along with some helpful resources.

Advance Directive


To adequately spell out your wishes regarding your end-of-life medical treatment, you need two legal documents: a "living will," which tells your doctor what kind of care you want to receive if you become incapacitated, and a "health care power of attorney" (or health care proxy), which authorizes a designated person to make medical decisions on your behalf if you are unable to do so.

These two documents are known as an "advance directive," and will only be utilized if you are too ill to make medical decisions yourself. You can also change or update it whenever you please.

Do-It-Yourself


It isn't necessary to hire a lawyer to complete an advance directive. There are free or low-cost resources available to help you write your advance directive, and it takes only a few minutes from start to finish.

One option that is completely free to use is Caring Connections, a resource created by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. They offer free downloads of state-specific advance directive forms with instructions on their website. You can also call 800-658-8898 and request copies of these forms. They will mail them to you and answer any questions you may have.

Want Legal Help


If you would rather work with a lawyer, look for one who specializes in estate planning and health care related matters. The National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys and the National Association of Estate Planners and Councils websites have directories to help you find an attorney. Costs will vary depending your state of residence, but you can expect to pay between $200 and $500 to get one made.

Do Not Resuscitate


You should also consider whether you want to include a do-not-resuscitate order (DNR) as part of your advance directive. Doctors and hospitals in every state accept them. To create a DNR, ask your doctor to help you fill out a state appropriate form.

Another tool you should know about is the Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST). Currently endorsed in 22 states with 24 more in some phase of development, a POLST form is for those who are approaching the end of life or suffering from a serious illness. The form compliments an advanced directive and lays out instructions for end-of-life medical wishes and orders. To learn more or set one up, visit the National POLST Paradigm website.

Tell Your Family


To insure your final wishes are followed, be sure to tell your family members, health care proxy and doctor so they all know what you want. You should also provide copies of your advance directive to everyone involved.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published June 8, 2018

Highly Acclaimed Ron Clark Academy Coming to Washington County; Parent Night June 12th

Washington County Community Foundation, through its generous donors, is bringing the Ron Clark Academy to Washington County. The Ron Clark Academy (RCA) is a highly-acclaimed, nonprofit middle school located in Southeast Atlanta. The Academy has received both national and international recognition for its success in educating students with academic rigor, passion, and creativity balanced by a strict code of discipline. The Academy seeks to extend its reach beyond its student body by having an impact upon students everywhere to learn better ways to engage students, promote academic rigor, and create a climate and culture that promotes success.

There is a Ron Clark Academy Parent Training at 6:00 on June 12th at the SHS Presentation Room at 500 N. Harrison Street in Salem. The session will conclude at 7:30 with the opportunity to ask questions of Kim Bearden, presenter from the Ron Clark Academy. Door prizes of several $50.00 gift cards will be given at the end of the session, but participants must be present to win.

All Washington County parents are invited to attend this special and informative evening.

Washington County Community Foundation is a nonprofit public charity established in 1993 to serve donors, award grants, and provide leadership to improve Washington County forever

End

How to Find Retiree Travel Perks

What types of travel discounts are available to older travelers? I just retired and am interested in learning about travel deals for people over 60.

There are literally thousands of different travel-related discounts available to retirees, usually for travelers between the ages 50 and 65. These discounts — typically ranging between 5% and 25% off — can add up to save you hundreds of dollars on your next trip. Here's how you can find them.

Ways to Save


The first thing to know is that most businesses do not advertise them, but many give senior discounts just for the asking, so don't be shy.

Be aware that when it comes to senior travel bargains, the "senior discount," if available, may not always be the best deal. Hotels, resorts, airlines and cruise lines, for example, offer advanced bookings along with special deals and promotions from time to time that may be a lower rate than the senior discount. Before you book, always ask about the lowest possible rate and the best deal available.

Another way retirees with flexible schedules can save is to be flexible when traveling. Taking advantage of last-minute travel deals, traveling during off-season or off-peak times and avoiding holidays can lead to huge savings.

Club memberships may also garner you a wide variety of travel bargains. AARP, for example has dozens of travel discounts available on hotels, rental cars, cruises and vacation packages. There are also alternative organizations you can join like the Seniors Coalition or the American Seniors Association that offer discounts on hotels and rental cars.

Types of Discounts


Here's an abbreviated rundown of some of the different travel discounts you can expect to find.

Transportation: For airline travel, Southwest has fully refundable senior fares for passengers 65 and older, and British Airways offers AARP members $65 off economy travel and $200 off business club travel. Airlines such as American, United and Delta also offer senior fares in certain markets but are extremely limited.

For traveling by train, Amtrak provides a 10% discount to travelers age 65 and above, and a 10% discount to passengers over age 60 on cross-border services operated jointly by Amtrak and VIA Rail Canada.

Greyhound bus lines also offers a 5% discount to passengers 62 and older. Most car rental companies offer 10% to 25% discounts to customers who belong to membership organizations like AARP or AAA.

Hotels: Many U.S. hotels offer senior discounts (at varying ages) usually ranging between 5% and 15% off. For example, Marriott offers a 15% discount to travelers 62 and older at over 4,000 locations worldwide. Wyndham hotel group offers 60-plus guests best available rate discounts.

Restaurants: Some restaurant chains offer senior discounts, ranging from free drinks, to senior menus, to discounts off your total order. National chains that offer these deals include Burger King, Chili's, Chick-fil-A, Dunkin Donuts, Golden Corral, IHOP and Wendy's. Offers may vary by location.

Cruises: Royal Caribbean and Carnival Cruise lines offer discount rates to cruisers 55 and over.

Entertainment and Attractions: Most movie theaters, museums, zoos, aquariums, public golf courses and even ski slopes provide reduced admission to individuals over 60 or 65. Individuals who are over the age of 62 are also eligible for the "Senior Pass," which provides a lifetime entry to 2,000 national parks and recreation sites. You can obtain this pass in person at one of the federal recreation sites for $80, or online for $90.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

'Extra Help' Program Helps with Medication Costs

Are there any special Medicare programs that help with medication costs? My 74-year-old mother, who lives primarily on her Social Security, takes several high-priced drugs that sap her income even with her Medicare drug plan.

Yes, there is a low-income subsidy program called Extra Help that can assist seniors on a tight budget with paying for their premiums, deductible and co-payments in their Medicare (Part D) prescription drug plan.

Currently, around 10 million people are receiving this subsidy, but another two million may qualify and not even realize it. They are missing out on hundreds, maybe thousands, of dollars in savings each year.

Changes in the law make it easier than ever to qualify for the Extra Help program. Even if your mom applied but was not qualified in the past, she may be eligible now. The amount of additional assistance she would receive depends on her income and assets. If she qualifies for help, she will pay no more than $3.35 for a generic drug and $8.35 for a brand-name drug in 2018.

To qualify to receive the subsidy, your mom's assets cannot exceed $14,100 (or $28,150 for married couples living together). Assets, for the purposes of qualifying for this program, include bank accounts, stocks and bonds. Homes, vehicles, personal belongings, life insurance and burial plots are not considered assets under the program.

In addition, your mom's monthly income cannot exceed $1,538 (or $2,078 for married couples). If your mom supports a family member who lives with her, or lives in Alaska or Hawaii, her income can be higher. The government will not include as income any funds that your mom receives for household expenses like food, rent, mortgage payments, utilities and property taxes.

How To Apply


There are three ways to apply for Extra Help: online at SSA.gov/prescriptionhelp; by calling Social Security at 800-772-1213; or by visiting a local Social Security office.

The application form is easy to complete, but you will need your mom's Social Security number and information about her bank account balances, pensions and investments. Social Security will review her application and send her a letter within a few weeks letting her know whether she qualifies.

If your mom doesn't qualify for Extra Help, she may still be able to get help from a state pharmacy assistance program or a patient assistance program. Visit the National Council on Aging's Benefits Check Up website to search for these programs.

Other Medicare Assistance


If your mom is eligible for Extra Help, she may also qualify for help with her other Medicare expenses through her state's Medicare Savings Program.

State Medicaid programs partner with the federal government, therefore income and asset qualifications vary depending on where she lives. Medicare Savings Programs may pay her entire Medicare Part B premium each month. Some also pay for Part B coinsurance and copayments, depending on her income. Contact your mom's state Medicaid office to determine if she qualifies for benefits in her state.

She can also get help through her State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP), which provides free one-on-one Medicare counseling in person or over the phone. To locate a SHIP counselor in your area, visit the SHIP National Technical Assistance Center website or call the eldercare locator at 800-677-1116.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published May 25, 2018

WCCF Celebrating Superhero Nonprofits with June Contest

WCCF has declared 2018 the Year of the Superhero.  In April, the fire fighters and law enforcement officers were honored; May brought The Wall that Heals to honor our veterans.  Washington County nonprofits will be recognized in June through a contest to highlight some of the organizations that WCCF, through its fantastic donors, has granted money to.  The contest is called the Game of Phones and is open to contestants aged 18 or older. 

All contestants must be a registered Facebook user and “like” the Washington County Community Foundation Facebook page.  The contest starts on June 1st and runs through June 25th.  The grand prize is a $500.00 gift card, second prize is a $150.00 gift card, and third prize is a $75.00 gift card.  Clues to determine the 21 different nonprofits will be given through www.wccf.biz under the “25th Anniversary” logo.  Once a contestant determines the answer to the clue, they should go to the organization, and then snap a selfie that will clearly indicate the organization (outside signage, building, or easily recognizable landmark).  Upload the picture to the Washington County Community Foundation Facebook page and use #WCCF25 as your caption.            One selfie from each location will be entered per contestant.  If a contestant takes a selfie at all 21 locations with the hashtag, the contestant will receive an additional 25 entries.  Washington County Community Foundation Board of Directors and staff, as well as their immediate family, are not eligible to win prizes in the contest.   Board Members and staff of the Washington County Community Foundation, as well as their immediate family, are eligible to post pictures on Facebook still using #WCCF25.  For more information, contact WCCF at 812-883-7334.  The complete list of rules can be found on the WCCF website, www.wccf.biz, under the 25th Anniversary Logo.

Washington County Community Foundation is a nonprofit public charity established in 1993 to serve donors, award grants, and provide leadership to improve Washington County forever

End

Make a Difference
Imagination Library
Youh Foundation
HEAP
Donate Now
education Matters
CF standards
Video Page
Mailing List
25th Anniversary

Washington County
Community Foundation

1707 North Shelby Street
Salem, Indiana 47167
Phone: 812-883-7334
E-Mail: info@wccf.biz

vimeo logo