Washington County Community Foundation Donors Award over $27K

Grants totaling over $27,000.00 were awarded to several organizations serving Washington County by the generous donors of the Washington County Community Foundation for the Spring 2019 grant cycle.  Grants are awarded from the Foundation’s Touch Tomorrow funds.

Friends of Beck’s Mill has been awarded a $3,000.00 grant to install gates for the parking lots in order to make the landmark safer for guests.

A $2,000.00 grant has been awarded to the Knobstone Hiking Trail Association to build a bridge, install drainage, and post signage for the section of the trail that passes through the Buffalo Bottoms area of the county.

Choices Life Resource Center has been awarded a grant in the amount of $2070.00 to update the Parent Program curriculum to teach parenting and life-skills which are offered free of charge to families.

A $3000.00 grant has been awarded to Jump Start to provide back-to-school supplies to students in need.

Washington County Senior Citizen Housing has been awarded a $6200.00 grant to assist with a grant writer in preparation to obtain a much larger grant from the Affordable Housing Program.  The grant will also be used to fund the cost of a capital needs assessment.

The Washington County Food Bank has been awarded a $2800.00 grant to build a roof system over the delivery entrance of the food bank to protect deliveries in inclement weather. 

A $3000.00 grant has been awarded to the City of Salem Parks and Recreation Department to construct two small ridges and a boardwalk across a bike trail so those utilizing the trail can safely cross soft ground. 

Ivy Tech Community College has been awarded a $5000.00 grant so they may offer free basic computer classes at the Community Learning Center one a month for a year.  Each course will be three hours long ad will cover a variety of topics such as Microsoft programs, cell phone operating systems, social media, and other technology skills.

Washington County Community Foundation is a nonprofit public charity established in 1993 to serve donors, award grants, and provide leadership to improve Washington County forever

The Long-Term Care Benefit Many Veterans Are Missing Out On

I have heard that the VA has a benefit that can help veterans and their spouses with long-term care costs. We recently had to move my 86-year-old father – who served in the army nearly 60 years ago – into an assisted living facility, and my mom is not far behind. Can the VA help?


The Veterans Administration has a little-known, underutilized benefit that can help wartime veterans and their surviving spouses pay for a variety of long-term care costs.

This benefit, called "Aid and Attendance," is a special pension that is paid in addition to a basic pension. It provides a maximum of $2,230 a month to married veterans, $1,881 a month to single veterans or $1,209 a month to a surviving spouse. The money is tax free and can be used to pay for in-home care, assisted living and nursing home care.

Today, approximately 230,000 veterans and survivors are receiving Aid and Attendance, but millions more are eligible and either do not know about it or do not think they qualify.

Eligibility Requirements


To qualify, your dad must have served at least 90 days of active military service with at least one day of service during a period of war and not have been dishonorably discharged. Single surviving spouses of wartime vets are eligible if their marriage ended when their spouse passed away.

In addition, your dad will have to meet certain thresholds for medical and financial need to be eligible. To qualify medically, he must be either disabled or over the age of 65 and need help with basic everyday living tasks, such as eating, dressing, bathing or going to the bathroom. He may also qualify if he is blind or in a nursing home or assisted living facility due to mental disability. Single surviving spouses have no age restrictions, but they must require help with basic everyday living tasks to be eligible.

To qualify financially, your parents must have limited assets, under $127,061, excluding their home, vehicle and personal belongings. In addition, their annual income (minus medical and long-term care expenses) cannot exceed the Maximum Allowable Pension Rate (MAPR). In 2019, the MAPR is $26,766 for a veteran and his or her spouse, $22,577 for a single veteran or $14,509 for a surviving spouse.

To calculate your parents' income qualifications, add up their income over the past year (including Social Security, pensions, interest income from investments, annuities, etc.), minus any out-of-pocket medical expenses, prescription drugs, insurance premiums and long-term care costs. If the final total is under the MAPR and he meets the other requirements, he should be eligible for aid.

How to Apply


To learn more, or to apply for Aid and Attendance, contact your regional VA benefit office where you can apply in person (see Benefits.va.gov/benefits/offices.asp or call 800–827–1000). You can also apply by writing the Pension Management Center in your state (see Benefits.va.gov/pension/resources-contact.asp). You will need to include evidence, like VA Form 21-2680, which your dad's doctor can fill out to show your dad's need for Aid and Attendance (see VA.gov/vaforms).

If you need some help, you can appoint a Veteran Service Officer (VSO) or a VA-accredited attorney or claims agent to represent your dad. See www.ebenefits.va.gov/ebenefits/vso-search to locate someone.

If your dad is eligible, it will take between six and 12 months for his application to be processed, so be patient.

If your dad's Aid and Attendance application is approved, the VA will send a lump sum retroactive payment covering the time from the day the application was filed until the day it was approved. From that point on, your dad will receive monthly payments going forward.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

2020 Census Offers Temporary Jobs Ideally Suited for Retirees

The U.S. Census Bureau is in the process of recruiting thousands of workers for temporary jobs to help collect valuable data for the 2020 Census, and retirees are ideal candidates. Can you write a column to get the word out? Thanks for your help!

I am happy to oblige, and I agree. This once-in-a-decade job opportunity is a great fit for retirees who have some free time on their hands and would like to earn some extra income while helping their communities.

Attention Retirees!


The United States Census Bureau is currently in the process of recruiting over 500,000 temporary workers to help carry out the upcoming 2020 Census, which is a national headcount of every person living in the U.S.

The U.S Census helps determine each state's representation in Congress; how funds are spent for schools, hospitals and roads; and provides information to guide many decisions made by government agencies, private businesses and institutions.

Jobs within the census vary from working in the field canvassing, updating maps, doing follow-up interviews with citizens in the community, to working in the office as a clerk doing administrative tasks or office operation supervisor who oversees the field staff.

Some jobs will begin this summer, but the majority of positions will begin in late April 2020 and last a month or two.

These temporary part-time positions are located in every county throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. Some positions require evening and/or weekend shifts because employees must be available to interview members of the public when they are at home. All positions require several days of online and classroom training. The pay ranges between $13.50 and $30 per hour depending on position and location. To find the pay rates in your area, see 2020census.gov/en/jobs/locations.html.

Job Qualifications


To be able to work for the 2020 Census you must:
  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Have a valid Social Security number
  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • Have a valid email address
  • Complete an application and answer assessment questions
  • Be registered with the Selective Service System or have a qualifying exemption if you are a male born after Dec. 31, 1959
  • Pass a Census-performed criminal background check and a review of criminal records, including fingerprinting
  • Commit to completing training
  • Be available to work flexible hours, which can include days, evenings and weekends.
In addition, most census jobs require employees to have access to a vehicle and a valid driver's license, unless public transportation is readily available. Access to a computer with an internet connection and an email account are necessary to complete training.

How to Apply


The first step is to complete the online job application at 2020census.gov/en/jobs. The process takes about 30 minutes and will include some assessment questions about your education, work and other experience.

If you are a veteran who would like to claim veterans' preference, which provides preference over nonveteran applicants, you will need supporting documentation.

After you apply, an interviewer will reach out to potential hires to conduct a phone interview, but not all applicants will be interviewed. Job offers are made verbally, but candidates will also receive a letter by email.

For more information on the 2020 Census, or if you have questions or problems with the application process, call 855-562-2020.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published May 10, 2019
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Safe Ways to Get Rid of Expired, Unused Medicine

What is the best and environmentally safe way to dispose of old and unused medications? My mother has a medicine cabinet full of pills, some of which have not been touched in 25 years. I would like to clean it out for her. 


Cleaning out the medicine cabinet is a chore that most people do not think about. It is an important task that can help prevent problems and protect children who may have access to these old, unused drugs. Here are some tips to help clean out your mother's medicine cabinet.

Return Them


Your local pharmacy, hospital, clinic, long-term-care facility or narcotic treatment program might accept your mom's unused medications. Often, there are "collect and destroy" programs that will accept old, unused prescriptions. Search for an authorized facility near you at DisposeMyMeds.org.

You can also drop off her unused medicines at designated police departments, fire stations and other sites on National Prescription Take Back Day, which is held on Saturday, April 27. To find a collection site near you, visit TakeBackDay.dea.gov.

Use a Disposal Kiosk


Many Walgreens and CVS stores have free, anonymous and secure kiosks where you can dispose of medications. Remove your personal information from the package and drop unwanted medication, including opioids, in the slot.

Mail Them


Costco, Rite Aid and CVS pharmacies sell postage-paid envelopes for customers to mail unused prescriptions, including opioids and over-the-counter medications, to a disposal facility.

Throw Them Out


While the above-mentioned options are preferred, you may dispose of them yourself. But do so carefully. The Food and Drug Administration recommends removing the medications from their original package and placing them in a sealable plastic bag with an undesirable substance like coffee grounds, dirt or cat litter. You should then seal the plastic bag and throw it in the trash. This will make the medication less appealing to children, pets or other people who may come in contact with your trash.

For some drugs, such as opioids, the FDA suggests flushing them down the toilet. However, this should only be done as a last resort because trace amounts of flushed drugs can pollute the water supply. To see the FDA list of medications that may be flushed, go to FDA.gov and type "flush list" into the search box.

Another option is to purchase some medication disposal bags, such as the Medsaway Medication Disposal System. Typically, medication disposal bags are carbon pouches that are designed to neutralize all medication including narcotics, liquid medication, transdermal patches and controlled substances. Once the medication is inside the pouch, you will need to add water and place the bag in the trash. You can find medication disposal bags at some local pharmacies or online for approximately $15.

You will also want to remove your mom's personal information from the empty medicine packaging before throwing it away to protect her identity and privacy. If you have other questions about proper drug disposal, talk to her pharmacist.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published May 3, 2019

Tricycles for Grown-Ups

What can you tell me about three-wheeled bicycles? I'm 65 years old and would like to start cycling again but I have some occasional balance problems and do not trust myself on a two-wheeled bicycle. What can you recommend?


Three-wheeled bikes, also known as adult tricycles, are a great cycling option for adults, especially for those who have concerns with their balance or stamina. Here is what you should know, along with some tips to help you shop for one.

Safer Cycling


If you would like to take up or continue bike riding but worry about falling, adult tricycles are a smart option to consider because of the stability they provide. With a tricycle, you can ride as slow as you want without ever losing your balance. You can also put both feet on the ground while seated, which is very reassuring for many older riders.

In addition, adult tricycles are also made with a low "step through" design, making mounting and dismounting easier. These bikes typically come with large tires that ensure a smooth ride, ergonomic handlebars that are easy to reach and grip and oversize seats for comfort and support. Other than the frame, tricycles use the same standard components as traditional bikes, so replacement parts are readily available and repairs are typically not an issue.

There are dozens of types of adult tricycles to choose from, with prices ranging anywhere from a few hundred to several thousand dollars. To help you figure out the type of tricycle that meets your needs and budget, here is a breakdown of the different styles and costs, along with some popular models to check out.

Upright Tricycles


If you are primarily interested in a leisurely ride around the neighborhood for pleasure, fitness or running errands, upright tricycles are a good choice. These are traditional upright-positioned tricycles that come with rear cargo baskets and limited gear options, usually ranging from one to three-speeds.

A great choice in this category is the Sun Traditional Trike that costs between $440 and $550. For a less expensive option, consider the Schwinn Meridian Adult Tricycle which is usually sold for around $300.

Recumbent Tricycles


Recumbent tricycles are the low-to-the-ground, stretched-out frame tricycles that allow you to recline with your legs positioned in front of you. Available in various styles, recumbent tricycles are very comfortable, easy on the back and aerodynamic, which make them ideal for longer rides.

TerraTrikes and Catrike are two of the biggest U.S. companies that make tadpole-style (two wheels are in front) recumbent tricycles. Or, consider Sun Seeker, a company that sells several Delta recumbent tricycles. These tricycles have two wheels in back and typically offer a higher seat level. Be aware that recumbent tricycles are much more expensive, typically ranging between $1,000 and $4,000.

E-Tricycles


If you want a boost from time-to-time, electric tricycles are a great option. These tricycles are hybrids that have pedals and a battery powered electric motor, so you can exercise when you want or, when you need a boost, the motor assist you. Electric Trike offers a variety of options with prices ranging from $1,500 to $3,000. Other brands to consider include Pedego Electric Bikes, ProdecoTech and Evelo.

Folding Tricycles


If you like to travel or if you have limited storage space, tricycles that are designed to fold up to fit in tight spaces are a great solution. The Kent Adult Westport Folding Tricycle and Mantis Tri-Rad Folding Adult Tricycle cost around $300 and are two popular options to check out.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published April 26, 2019
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How SSI Can Help Low-Income Seniors and the Disabled

What can you tell me about the Supplemental Security Income program and what are the eligibility requirements? My father has a very low income, so I am wondering if this is something he may qualify for.

Supplemental Security Income (or SSI) is a program administered by the Social Security Administration that provides monthly cash benefits, based on financial need, to people who are disabled or over age 65. Currently, more than 8 million people are receiving SSI benefits. Here are some things you should know.

Eligibility Requirements


To qualify for SSI, your dad must be age 65 or older, blind or disabled and have limited assets and income. He must also be a U.S. citizen or lawful resident.

His assets must be less than $2,000. (The asset limit is $3,000 for couples.) This includes cash, bank accounts, other personal property and anything else that could potentially be converted to cash. His home, household goods and one vehicle, along with life insurance policies and burial funds valued under $1,500, do not count towards countable assets.

The income limit to qualify for SSI, however, is much more complicated. Countable income includes wages or any other kind of money your dad earned from working, plus money he gets from other sources like unemployment, Social Security retirement, gifts from friends and free food or shelter.

In 2019, the SSI allowable income limit is $771 a month for an individual or $1,157 a month for a couple. If your dad's countable income is over the SSI allowable limit (which is based on a complex set of rules and calculations — see SSA.gov/ssi/text-income-ussi.htm) he will not qualify. But if he is under the limit, he could qualify for some benefits depending on his countable income.

To help you determine if your dad is eligible for SSI, help him take the Social Security Administration's benefits screening test at SSAbest.benefits.gov. This online questionnaire takes approximately five minutes to complete and screens for a variety of benefits, including SSI.

Most states, with the exception of Arizona, Mississippi, North Dakota and West Virginia, supplement the federal SSI payment with payments of their own. In some of the states that pay a supplement, your dad may qualify for the state payment even if he does not meet the federal SSI eligibility criteria.

How to Apply


If you think that your dad is eligible for SSI, call 800-772-1213 and set up an appointment to apply at his local Social Security office.

To help make the application process go quickly and smoothly, your dad should bring his Social Security number; birth certificate or other proof of age; information about the home where he lives, such as his mortgage or lease and the landlord's name; payroll slips, bank statements, insurance policies, burial fund records and other information about his income and the property he owns; his proof of U.S. citizenship or eligible noncitizen status; and, if he is applying for SSI because he is disabled or blind, the names, addresses and telephone numbers of doctors, hospitals and clinics that have information related to his condition.

For more information, visit SSA.gov/ssi or call Social Security at 800-772-1213 and ask them to mail you a copy of publication 11000 "Supplemental Security Income (SSI)." You can also read it online at SSA.gov/pubs/EN-05-11000.pdf.

Other Assistance Programs


Depending on your dad's income, needs and location there are other financial assistance programs that may be able to help him, including Medicaid, prescription drug assistance, food stamps and energy assistance. To find out what other services he may be eligible for visit BenefitsCheckUp.org. This is a free, confidential web tool that contains more than 2,500 programs.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published April 19, 2019

Finding Health Insurance Before Medicare Kicks In

I will be retiring in a few months and my wife and I will need health insurance until we can enroll in Medicare. What are my options?


There are several places early retirees can find health insurance coverage before becoming eligible for Medicare. The best option for you and your wife will depend on your income level and your healthcare needs. Here are some options to consider.

Government Marketplace


If your yearly income falls below 400% of the poverty level after you retire, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace may be your best option for getting health coverage because of the premium subsidies offered under the ACA. These subsidies reduce the amount you will have to pay for a policy.

The ACA marketplace offers major medical insurance that covers essential health benefits with no annual or lifetime coverage maximums. In addition, you cannot be charged more or be denied coverage because of a pre-existing health condition.

To qualify for the subsidies, your household's modified adjusted gross income for 2019 must be under $48,560 for an individual, or $65,840 for a couple. If your income is just above these thresholds, you should talk to a tax advisor about perhaps making a larger IRA contribution or strategically timing retirement account withdrawals to help you qualify.

To shop for marketplace plans in your state, visit HealthCare.gov or call the toll-free helpline at 800-318-2596.

If you find that you are not eligible for the subsidies and the premiums seem unaffordable, look into ACA-compliant plans that you can purchase of the marketplace directly from an insurance carrier or through a broker. In some states, you might find plans with lower premiums, especially on silver plans.

To find off-the-marketplace policies, see health insurance shopping websites like eHealthInsurance.com, or contact a broker or agent to assist you. Visit LocalHelp.HealthCare.gov to locate a broker or agent in your area.

Short-Term Health Insurance


If you cannot find an affordable ACA plan, you may want to consider short-term health insurance, which can be much cheaper. These plans, which are not available in every state, are bare-bones health plans that provide coverage for three, six or 12 months, depending on state and federal rules. Be aware that short-term plans are not required to comply with the ACA. As such, these plans can deny coverage, do not cover preexisting conditions and can exclude coverage essentials like prescription drugs.

To shop for short-term health insurance, visit eHealthInsurance.com or contact a local broker or agent via LocalHelp.HealthCare.gov.

COBRA


If you need health insurance coverage for less than 18 months, another option you may want to consider is COBRA, which allows you to remain on your former employer's group health plan. Note that not every employer plan is COBRA eligible. Contact your employer benefits administrator to find out if your employer's plan qualifies.

In most cases COBRA is expensive and you are required to pay the full monthly premium. However, if you have already met, or nearly met, your employer plan's deductible and/or out-of-pocket maximum for the year, it may make sense to keep your current coverage under COBRA if you do not want to start over with a new plan or if you find your employer's health plan to be better or more affordable than other options.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published April 5, 2019

How to Improve Your Balance as You Age

I've always been a walker, but after I fell last month my doctor suggested I start doing some balance exercises. Is this really something I need to practice?


Most people do not think much about practicing their balance, but it is something that should be considered. Just as you walk to strengthen your heart, lungs and overall health, you should practice maintaining your balance.

As we age, our balance declines, which can increase the risk of falling. Every year, more than one in three people age 65 years or older fall and the risk increases with age. A simple fall can cause a serious fracture of the hip, pelvis, spine, arm, hand or ankle. These injuries can lead to hospital stays, disability, loss of independence and even death.

How Balance Works


Balance is the ability to distribute your weight in a way that enables you to hold a steady position or move at will without falling. It is determined by a complex combination of muscle strength, visual inputs, the inner ear and the work of specialized receptors in the nerves of your joints, muscles, ligaments and tendons that orient you in relation to other objects.

The sensory cortex of your brain takes in the information from these sources to give you balance. Aging dulls our sense of balance and causes most individuals to gradually become less stable on their feet over time.

Poor balance can also lead to a vicious cycle of inactivity. You may feel a little unsteady, so you avoid or curtail certain activities. If you are inactive, you are not challenging your balance systems or using your muscles. As a result, both balance and strength suffer. Simple acts like strolling through a grocery store or getting up from a chair become increasingly difficult. This can shake your confidence and cause you to become even less active.

Balance Exercises


If you have a balance problem that is not tied to illness, medication or some other specific cause, simple exercises can help preserve and improve your balance. Some basic exercises you can do anytime include:
  • One-legged stands: Stand on one foot for 30 seconds, or longer, then switch to the other foot. You can do this while brushing your teeth or even while waiting in line somewhere. In the beginning, you might want to have a wall or chair to hold on to.
  • Heel rises: While standing, rise up on your toes, lifting your heel as high as you can. Then drop back to the starting position and repeat the process 10 to 20 times. You can make this more difficult by holding light hand weights.
  • Heel-toe walk: Take 20 steps and, with every step, touch your heel to your toe on your opposite foot. Keep your focus straight ahead instead of looking down at your feet.
  • Sit-to-stand: Without using your hands, get up from a straight-backed chair and sit back down 10 to 20 times. This improves balance and leg strength.
For additional balance exercises visit go4life.nia.nih.gov, a resource created by the National Institute on Aging that offers free booklets and a DVD that provides illustrated examples of many balance exercises. You can order your free copies online or by calling 800-222-2225.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published March 29, 2019

Palliative Care Services Can Help Relieve Pain

What can you tell me about palliative care? My husband suffers from lung disease and is receiving radiation for prostate cancer but is not terminally ill. I have heard that palliative care can help him with his pain and discomfort. What can you tell me?


Palliative care is a very effective service that can help patients relieve the symptoms and stress associated with a serious illness. Unfortunately, most people do not know about it or do not understand how it can help. Here is what you should know.

What is Palliative Care?


Most people hear the words "palliative care" and think "hospice," but these are two different types of care. Hospice is reserved for when curative treatments have been exhausted and patients have less than six months to live. Palliative care, on the other hand, is a medical specialty that focuses on providing relief from symptoms of a serious illness, such as pain, shortness of breath, fatigue, constipation, nausea, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping and depression. It can also help patients deal with the side effects of medical treatment.

Anyone with a serious illness can benefit from palliative care, including those with cancer, heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease, Alzheimer's, HIV/AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and other serious illnesses. Palliative care can be provided along with curative treatment at any age and during any stage of a serious illness.

Palliative care is provided by a team that works with your doctor to provide an extra layer of support and care. This team may include palliative care doctors, nurses, social workers and other specialists. Palliative care teams are trained to help patients understand all of their treatment options along with the quality of life ramifications so that patients can make informed decisions regarding what is best for them.

Often, patients assume their doctors will take care of their pain and stress, but some doctors may not be well-trained in pain and symptom management. That is why palliative care is invaluable.

Palliative care was developed in the United States in the 1990s but didn't became a formal medical subspecialty in 2008. Today, palliative care programs exist in 57% of U.S. hospitals with more than 50 beds and in 90% of hospitals with 300 beds or more.

How to Receive Care


According to the Center to Advance Palliative Care, there are approximately six million people in the U.S. who have a need for palliative care but most patients do not know to ask for it. If you feel that a palliative care specialist could help your husband, start by talking to his doctor and ask for a referral. If his doctor is not helpful, visit GetPalliativeCare.org where you can search for a specialist in your area.

Palliative care can be provided in a variety of places, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, doctors' clinics and at your own home. You will also be happy to know that most private insurance plans, as well as Medicare and Medicaid, cover palliative care services.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

WCCF is Offering Scholarships to Non-Traditional Students

The Washington County Community Foundation is now offering scholarships to non-traditional students through its Education Matters initiative. 

Education Matters is a regional undertaking organized by the community foundations that serve Washington, Scott, Harrison, Clark and Floyd counties to try to increase the number of working adults in our region who started but never completed some form of post-secondary education – education that extends beyond high school.

You might be surprised to learn that in Southeast Indiana, only 25% of our workforce has an associate’s, bachelors or professional degree, compared to 38% nationally. Yet one in four of our community’s adult workers has earned some college credits! That’s over 3,100 people in Washington County!  For whatever reason, they started but never completed their post-secondary education. This represents a tremendous amount of untapped potential in our community.

The community foundations that created Education Matters have elected to concentrate on a small sliver of the overall issue, those one in four of our adult workers who have some post-secondary credits but did not complete their degrees or certifications. This population of people who started but didn’t finish their education is where the Washington County Community Foundation sees opportunity to implement immediate changes that can drive our educational attainment numbers up, ultimately having real impact on our community.

The following criteria have been established for this first round of scholarships:  

  1. Annual awards will not exceed $3,000 the first twelve months and $5,000 per person in any subsequent twelve-month period.
  2. Scholarship applicants must be a minimum of 28 years old as of the date of application.
  3. Only individuals who can demonstrate continuing legal residence in Washington County for at least the past five years are eligible. Documentation such as tax forms, housing receipts, or utility bills will be used to verify residency and/or household income.
  4. Scholarship awards may be used for tuition, course-related fees, or books only. Checks will only be written to an educational institution or certified training provider.
  5. The application deadline is 3:30 on April 15, 2019. No exceptions. Applicants should apply online at wccfapplyonline.biz
  6. Adult scholarship awards may not be used to pay for college debt.
  7. Subsequent awards will only be considered for students maintaining at least a 2.5 GPA.

Call the Washington County Community Foundation office at 883-7334 or email program.officer@wccf.biz to request an application or for more information.

The mission of the Washington County Community Foundation is to engage people, build resources and strengthen our community. 

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